Monday, December 16, 2013

Is Farm Animal Cruelty Common?

I just read a story in Rolling Stone Magazine titled "Animal Cruelty Is the Price We Pay for Cheap Meat”. If I was reading this as someone who has never been on a farm, I would be mortified. What a horrible picture this story paints of animal agriculture!

What the Rolling Stone story describes is NOT an accurate description of a dairy farm. I’m a third generation dairy producer who grew up on a dairy farm. I know lots of dairy farmers and have been to a number of farms. I’d like to share my experience. The Rolling Stone article discusses several types of livestock operations, but I’ll only cover dairy because that’s what I know.

Rolling Stone (RS) article info & the Reality on our Farm

RS: Livestock are “raised for our consumption in dark, filthy, pestilent barns. Milk cows are raised, like pigs, on a concrete slab in a stall barely bigger than their body.”
Reality: Our cows live in large, comfortable freestall barns with individual beds. Fans keep them cool in the summer and curtains/doors can be rolled down to enclose the barn keeping the animals warm in the winter. They have free-choice fresh water to drink and nutritious food to eat. They can move about to eat, drink, rest and socialize whenever they like. They are healthy, comfortable and content in this calm environment which was created especially to meet their needs.  

Inside the freestall barn; cows can eat, rest, walk around or socialize
Relaxing in her individual sand bed
Cows socializing by the water trough in the freestall barn

RS: “A cocktail of drugs, combined with breeding decisions, has grossly distended the size of a cow’s udder so they trip over it if allowed to graze, which of course they’re not.”
Reality: Cow’s udders come in all sizes, some are small and some are large. They tend to sag as cows age. We don’t breed our cows to have giant udders. We do want cows with good milk production, but the size of udder doesn’t necessarily correlate to the quantity of milk she produces. I’ve never seen a cow “trip over her udder”. Our milk cows spend the majority of the time in the barn and are quite happy there. When weather permits, some animals are housed outside. We make these decisions based on what is best for the animals.

Cows walking to the milking parlor - their udders come in a variety of sizes
During warm months, some of our animals are outside.









RS: “Cow’s hooves are rotted black from standing in their own shit, their teats are scarred, swollen and leaking pus – infected by mastitis – and they’re sick to the verge of total collapse from giving nearly 22,000 pounds of milk a year.”
Reality: Our barns are cleaned remove manure several times each day because we don’t want cows standing in manure. They also get their hooves trimmed regularly (like a pedicure). It’s import to keep cows udders and teats healthy. That’s why the milking machine is lined with soft rubber and stays on the cow a limited amount of time (usually 5 minutes/milking). Occasionally a cow can get mastitis, if she does we put her in the hospital pen where she receives treatment and special care until she’s well. Our cows are healthy because we make sure they are cared for properly; they eat well, drink plenty of fresh water, live in comfortable, dry conditions and receive medical treatment when necessary.

The barns are kept clean - manure is removed from the barn several times each day
The milking process is comfortable for the cows; the machine is on her about 5 minutes

RS: Animal rights activists are, “infiltrating farms and documenting the abuse done to livestock herds by the country’s agri-giants.”
Reality: Farming is a family business. Many farms are multi-generational. Ninety-eight percent of U.S. dairy farms are owned and operated by families. Larger farms depend on employees. In addition to our family labor, we have nine full-time staff at our farm. We are still a family farm. 

Lad feeds a newborn calf colostrum as our son, Garret watches
Taylor works at our farm, he's great with the cows and we're lucky he's on our team

RS: “The U.S. Department of Agriculture is so short-staffed that it typically only sends inspectors out to slaughterhouses, where they check a small sample of pigs, cows and sheep before they’re put to death."
Reality: Dairy farms are inspected regularly. A state licensed milk inspector comes to our farm, unannounced, several times each year. There are many rules and regulations we follow to ensure the milk produced on our farm is safe and healthy. Any dairy farm producing Grade A milk, regardless of size, must follow the same rules to maintain a milk producer license.   
 
After being milked, cows can hang out on this deck then walk back to their barn when they're ready

RS: Cattle and hog farmers “dump antibiotics into the grain they fed the stock.”
Reality: Our cows are not fed antibiotics. All milk is tested for antibiotics before it is allowed to be unloaded at a milk processing plant. If the load tests positive for antibiotics, it is discarded. If we fed antibiotics, we would not be able to sell our milk. For example, if one cow is being treated with antibiotics at our farm and her milk accidentally gets into our 4,000 gallon milk tank, that entire tank load of milk will test positive for antibiotics and be dumped. As a result, we would not be paid for that tank load of milk and would face disciplinary action from the state department of agriculture. There is no economic advantage to overusing antibiotics.

Cows love to eat! These girls are enjoying a well balanced diet.

The real animal advocates are farmers and ranchers who care for animals daily. They are the people who dedicate their lives to animal welfare. 

These heifers love the people who care for them!

The undercover videos I’ve seen show one or two individual employees doing the wrong thing. It’s never ok to abuse an animal. People who make the wrong choice should face justice and suffer the consequences of their actions. These are rare cases that get lots of attention. Though uncommon, abuse happens. It can happen to humans and animals in homes, assisted living facilities, daycares and sometimes on farms. It’s not normal or acceptable behavior.

If you have questions about farming, I urge you to talk to a farmer or visit a farm. You'll be pleasantly surprised at what you find!

Meet dairy farmers from around the country at Dairy Farming Today’s “Farmer Spotlight”.

Read what other dairy and livestock farmers have to say:
Sometimes we are mean to our cows by Dairy Carrie, Dairy Farmer
Animal Curelty is NOT the Price we Pay for Cheap Meat, by Wanda Patsche, Hog Farmer

Take a look inside a beef processing facility at Glass Walls Beef Plant featuring Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University and widely considered to be the world's leading expert on humane animal handling at meat packing plants.

The Rolling Stone article is very one-sided, full of false information and written with an agenda in mind. You don’t have to be vegan to be compassionate. It doesn’t appear that they bother talking to any farmers before writing their story. That’s disappointing. The majority of farmers do a great job caring for animals and operating their farms. If you have question about food and farming, I urge you to ask a farmer.


49 comments:

  1. Nice representation of the industry and well thought out rebuttal of the Rolling Stone piece.

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  2. What dark ugly rock do these people crawl out from under. Obviously have no farm experience. I lived on a farm, my family milked cows, and I never saw a cow trip over her udder!!! People, get a grip for God sake. I do realize there are people who do abuse their animals. However, I do believe you will find that almost all dairy farmers take wonderful care of their animals. The Hastings dairy is one example of animals being cared for humanely and compassionately. They want to produce the milk people pick up in the grocery stores in as clean an environment as possible. Happy cows produce happy amounts of milk. So, before you start badmouthing do your research!

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  3. Thank you for taking the time to write this piece! It was most articulate.
    Articles like the one in Rolling Stone make me angry and sad at the same time. So few folks understand what actually happens on a farm and that means they believe anything. (and it seems the more horrific, the better) Don't these people realize that the animals and the land must be cared for in order for there to be enough food and clothing for everyone? Where is their logic? *sigh*
    Keep the faith!

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  4. Great response to an article which is so far from true it is silly to us in the industry. Sad to say many will believe it because the read it .

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  5. Great article, Brenda. I really appreciate the time you take from your busy day to respond to this kind of thing. We need more farmers like you setting the record straight.

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  6. Well written and explained!

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  7. Thank you for letting everyone know the truth about us, farmers. I hope you get your article published in the Rolling Stone magazine. On behalf of all of us doing our job to feed the poor and dress the naked, thank you!

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  8. Wow! Thanks for letting me know the facts. I didn't think farmers would treat animals so badly. Farmers depend on these animals for their living. I'm not a farmer and never thought about where milk comes from. Now I know the facts from you. Thanks.

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    1. I appreciate you taking the time to research animal care further than just taking the word of people who write articles for Rolling Stone or Time. The best source for information about farm animals are farmers and ranchers. Thanks for your comment.

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  9. I love how well written and concise this article is. Wish I could see it in the Rolling Stone. As a retired veterinary technician who preferred large animal practice, I can vouch for the fact that the vast majority of farmers want healthy, happy animals, not only because they produce better products, but because they care about the animals they raise. If they didn't. I don't think I'd have seen so many calves, piglets, chicks, lambs and goat kids in so many farmer's kitchens being tended to night and day in an attempt to save their lives. I can also recommend this for your reading pleasure. Also very well written in reply to those who spread misinformation about animal husbandry practices in their efforts to make livestock farming taboo. http://dairycarrie.com/2013/12/09/cowabuse/

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    1. Thanks for the insight Jennifer. I follow Dairy Carrie and love reading her blog!

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  10. Thank you for writing this! Well done! Your dairy and cows are beautiful.

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  11. What about the fact that babies must be taken away from their mothers on dairy farms, and the fact that male calves are made into veal?

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    1. It's a myth that all male (bull) calves are raised for veal. Our bull calves are sold at the livestock auction every Monday. They are purchased by someone who will most likely raise them to become steers that will be harvested for beef when mature.

      Calves are moved to an individual hutch soon after birth (usually within a few hours). This is done for the benefit of the calf and cow. To learn more, check out my blog “Newborn calf and fresh cow care” http://thedairymom.blogspot.com/2010/06/newborn-calf-and-fresh-cow-care.html.

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    2. If you think all bull calves are sold for veal I have a very simple and logical way to put that to the test. Go to your local grocery store and see how much veal is there and compare this to the amount of beef that is for sale. If all bulls were made into veal and all heifers are made to milk the meat case would have a much different look. Common sense and a little insight would easily prove this myth incorrect

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    3. Wes, you're right, because most veal is sold in restaurants. Nice try though! I see you've some research to do.

      And the author still does not acknowledge that any mother goes through incredible agony when her baby is taken away from her, never to be returned.. This is a simple biological fact, not my opinion. That agony is there whether she likes to admit it or not, and no matter whether the calves are sold at auction or not.

      My best friend in the world grew up on one of these small dairy farms. I questioned her at length about this a while back and she confirmed for me that it is standard industry practice to remove babies from their mothers, and that the mothers go through pain over that separation. We are arrogant beyond belief if we think that we are the only species on the planet who love our young and do not want them taken from us permanently.

      By the way, once the calves are sold I doubt very much the author knows exactly what happens to them.

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    4. Holstein bulls can be raised for veal or beef. There is a lot more beef than veal consumed in this country. As long as people consume these products, farmers will produce them. People deserve to have the choice.

      The cow and calf are separated for their own health and well-being. I encourage you to seek out a large animal veterinarian and ask if it’s best to separate the cow from the calf. On our farm, we do things for a reason which is based on what is best for the animals.

      I can’t speak to the experience your friend had, I can only tell you about the experience we have on our farm. Our animals are happy, healthy and thriving.

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  12. Thank you for this wonderful article! I love your blog and what you do! Thank you, thank you thank you!

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  13. As a large animal veterinarian in a rural practice environment, I have never met a professional in production agriculture who was not passionate about providing the best for his animals that he possibly could. The reason I love large animal practice is that it gives me the opportunity to associate with the best people on earth, the people who every day give their all to help their animals. There are people who do not adhere to these principles, but they are not the ones whose livelihood depend on their animals; and even the professional can accidentally hire a bad employee. There are lots of people who fail to properly care for their animals, generally through ignorance. But you won't find them involved in commercial production agriculture.

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    1. It's great to hear your perspective as a veterinarian who works with a variety of farmers. Thank you for everything you do for dairy farmers and their animals!

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  14. The real point of all this is, Who the hell reads Rolling Stone?. That rag never represented anything worthwhile in it's lifetime as an ignorant tree huggers soapbox.

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  15. Thanks for your article. I am not a farmer, but do have a daughter who is a dairy farmer in the Milton area of PA. She gets more abuse from the cows than she could ever give. Why do people think the way they do. You say everthing so well even with pictures to show how you work with the animals.
    Annamay Porchik, Phoenixville, PA

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  16. Love this piece really show people how the industry works, I love learning on other farmers day to day living. I know how people assume and don't understand and it's really frustrating especially when you are providing the best care for the animal. Keep up the good work and continue your day to day family tradition on the family farm. it breaks my heart seeing farmers targeted by PETA or uneducated people.

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  17. This is a great article and I applaud all of the family farmers out there. However, and unfortunately, not all farms are family farms. There ARE factory farms out there and if you don't think there are maybe YOU should educate YOURSELF.

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    1. Almost every dairy farm (98%) in the U.S. is owned and operated by a family. A family farm might milk 5 cows or they might milk 5,000 cows. Size doesn't dictate the type of farm or the level of care animals receive. The terms “factory farm”, “corporate farm” or “industrial farm” were invented by movie producers, authors and organizations with the goal to portray larger farms as negligent, faceless machines that don’t care about animals or the environment. Nothing is further from the truth. Our farm is large by some standards and small by others. There is a need for farms of all sizes and we should celebrate this diversity.

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    2. I mentioned this in a comment on some other article, but it fits here as well. I think the term "family farm" is past usefulness, much like the word "natural" on food. There are farms that are listed as family farms where no one (or very few) from the family has ever even been on the farm. Some of them are very large and are run exactly like the worst-case feedlot/agribusiness examples. To your statement, "There is a need for farms of all sizes," I would add, "as long as there is adequate staff and resources for the farm." I don't think farming scales well. I do think it's tempting to bite off more than one can chew. I do not think that a staff of five can do the same for 5000 animals as they can for 500.

      That all being said, I think the Rolling Stone article was irresponsible. I get 80-90% of my food directly from farms precisely because I don't want to consume "that" kind of crap from those kinds of farmers. I do understand that they are in the minority but they exist and they tend to be from farms that are under-resourced.

      This is an argument that has many fronts. The militant vegans have a very peculiar point of view and I'd like to simply dismiss them, but they are obnoxious and seem to be ubiquitous. Most of the population has no clue how their food is raised and can't tell the difference between the good and the bad. For example, if you go see Food, Inc in a crowd, people gasp at both the industrial beef kill floor AND Joel Salatin's clean, humane outdoor chicken slaughtering operation. Those people will believe whatever the militant vegans tell them. (NOTE: Notice my use of the qualifier "militant." I do not think all vegans are obnoxious--just the ones that post obnoxious comments all over the Internet and never let a good fact get in the way of their opinions.)

      I think it is important for folks such as yourself (but all of us really) to teach, teach teach. The more the average person knows about where their food comes from, the better off we all are.

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    3. You make some good points. I agree that farmers, regardless of farm size, have an obligation to make sure land and animals are cared for properly. I’ve seen large farms that operate very well with excellent animal care and some small farms that could use improvement where animal care is concerned. It’s important that we don’t stereotype farmers and their ability to be responsible based only on the size of farm they operate.

      I grew up in California where there are lots of large dairy farms. The owners were usually present on the farm daily to oversee the operation. If you milk more than 50 cows, it’s usually necessary to hire staff to help. There are many good herdsmen, milkers, cow and calf feeders, and other staff who work on dairy farms across the country daily. I don’t want to sell them short.

      I agree it’s vital for farmers to provide accurate information and have dialogue about what they do on their farms. Thanks for participating in the conversation!

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  18. This is a good article about family farms. However, you missed the point entirely. The RS article was NOT talking about family farms. They were talking about FACTORY farms. Two different kinds of farms and unfortunately most of the meat we eat DOES come from factory farms, unless you are part of a CSA or by from a store like Whole Foods where they label their food(so you know it's not from a factory, etc).

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    1. Please see my response to the comment right above yours. I purchase food for my family at grocery stores like Walmart and Giant Eagle. During summer months, I purchase some items at neighborhood farm produce stands. It's not accurate to think that only food from CSA's or Whole Foods is healthy, quality and comes from farms who care about what they're producing. Whole Foods does an excellent job marketing their products as superior, but that doesn't mean they are. More expensive doesn't necessarily mean better. There is room for all types of food outlets from Farmers Markets to CSA's to Walmart, etc. It's great we have so many choices.

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    2. I am interested to know how you define a factory farm. I grew up on a dairy farm and while in college worked at a 1200 cow dairy and my boyfriend (now husband) worked on an1800 cow dairy. Both farms were owned by families who had incorporated for tax reasons. Cattle on both farms were treated very humanely, and monitored closely for health and comfort. Employees were paid well, and trained carefully. Abuse of an animal was grounds for firing (and yes, they used some video cameras to monitor this) I have seen a few small "family farms" where the ignorance of the owner caused cows to be kept in poor health and/or poor condition.
      Unfortunately, the farmer doesn't have a say on the price they are paid for their product, so for some, more cows is the only way to provide a better living for their families, and it is their right to do so.
      Saying that all farms, or even that a majority of farms abuse their animals because you have seen a few news stories where this is true is akin to saying that all pet owners abuse their pets because some do, or that all parents abuse their children, because some do.
      This article was well written and very factual.

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  19. Thank you for standing up to the idiots with "agendas" so tired of information being spread on the internet that is completely false and unfounded yet spreads like fire. We need more young people like yourself telling it like it is and giving good education for those who have never experienced your world. Thanks for being a "truth teller". Belinda M. Visalia, CA (Gramby with a garden)

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    1. Thanks Belinda. I grew up on a dairy farm in Tulare, CA, so I'm very familiar with the Central Valley. I enjoyed growing up and living there!

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  20. Thank you so much for writing this! My husband and I are dairy farmers in Wisconsin and when we heard that an operation had been shut down it was heart breaking. Everything you wrote about "Reality" was completely true. We've had people comment on how sad it is that calves are removed from their mothers right away. We explain that it's for their own benefit. These PETA people always make me frustrated because more than likely they didn't grow up on farms or out in the country where they could experience farm life. My husband is a stubborn man, like many farmers. He doesn't like going to see a doctor but the second a cow gets sick we treat her right away. If it's something we can't treat ourselves out comes the vet. Farm life is such a rewarding living. I couldn't imagine living anywhere else.

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  21. The title of the Rolling Stones article is entitled "CHEAP" meat. not "ALL" meat. The article is correct unless you are telling us that your farm sells meat to McDonald's.

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    1. The Rolling Stone article is far from correct. The milk from our farm goes to a local Swiss cheese manufacturer who makes cheese that is sold to grocery stores and restaurants. This cheese can be found on sandwiches at Subway or on hamburgers and chicken sandwiches at McDonald’s. It’s good quality cheese that is made at a family-owned cheese processing plant. I’m proud our milk is used to make a nutritious product people enjoy.

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    2. I am confused. I thought the article was about cheap meat. That is the only thing I know about. I have seen mercy for animals videos on Burger King dairy cows though. What is the name of your Swiss cheese manufacturer? How do you know they sell their cheese to McDonald's? I didn't even know that McDonald's had Swiss cheese!

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    3. Our milk goes to Middlefield Swiss cheese. I’m in contact with them so am familiar with where some of their Swiss cheese is sold. Yes, McDonald’s uses Swiss cheese on their chicken club sandwich and used it on the Angus Mushroom & Swiss burger (not sure if that one is still on the menu). Contrary to what articles like this want you to believe, many quick serve restaurants use quality ingredients produced on family farms of all sizes. In fact, dairy farmers have partnered with restaurants like Domino’s Pizza, Taco Bell and McDonald’s to assist in creating menu items featuring wholesome dairy products. Just because a food item has good value doesn’t mean its poor quality. The majority of beef, cheese, vegetables, and other ingredients used at quick serve restaurants is produced by family farmers.

      Food elitist want you to believe that only food purchased at a farmers market, an expensive grocery store like Whole Foods or overpriced quick serve restaurants like Chipotle is quality food from family farms. They will tell you food purchased at a regular grocery store or reasonably priced quick serve restaurant is poor quality from so-called “factory farms” or “corporate farms”. That is simply not true! Just because something is more expensive, doesn’t mean it’s better quality or healthier. Much of the “added value” is often centered on marketing and misleading food labels.

      Check out my blogs:
      Antibiotic Free and Responsibly Raised @ http://www.thedairymom.blogspot.com/2013/07/antibiotic-free-and-responsibly-raised.html

      When it comes to food & animals emotion trumps fact and reality @ http://www.thedairymom.blogspot.com/2013/09/when-it-comes-to-food-animals-emotion.html

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    4. Plenty of Holstein dairy cow meat in McDonalds burgers, though even they don't really seem "cheap" anymore!

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  22. I work for Farm Business Consultants a 61 yr old Canadian company. I have spent a lot of time on farms in Ontario and frankly, FARMERS ARE AWESOME PEOPLE!!
    I read the article and this is what I took from it.
    "a cartel of corporations that have swallowed family farms, moved the animals indoors to prison-style plants in the middle of rural nowhere, far from the gaze of nervous consumers, and bred their livestock to and past exhaustion".
    The average farmer takes very good care of the animals on their farms as they are essential to the family income. What seems to be taking place in these "corporate controlled farms" is a lack of human care. Lets face it. When you have an employee that is paid poorly and over worked you have someone that really does not care.
    That is not the case on a family farm!! Huge corps have huge problems as employees have very little incentive to care...Never mind that they should, as caring human beings, as obviously we are all familiar with humans being very bad to each other let alone an animal.
    You can not force people to care! You can however vote with your dollars and boycott all but healthy family run farms. How??? They call it the internet, chances are you do not have to go far to find a farmers market or an actual farm.
    I don't eat at McDonalds or any of the others. When I want food, I actually want real food.
    Check out a family farm and sample what food is supposed to taste like and certainly do not paint every farm with the same brush..We have good, we have bad, and we have outstanding! Go find an outstanding family farm...Oh wait, you are already here aren't you.
    I don't know "The Dairy Mom" I don't even live in the same country, but I know her type and she should be thanked!!

    So thank you for what you do. Too many people from large cities have no idea that the meat comes from anywhere but the freezer and milk comes in bags and bottles...Really!!!???

    Michael F. McDougall...Google me to see what a jerk I am!



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    1. Thanks for your kind comments about farmers! Since you’ve had experience working with farmers, you probably know 98% of U.S. dairy farms are family owned and operated. Family farms are sometimes set up as corporations, such as an LLC and family farms come in all sizes. Some are large and require non-family staff. Most farm employees we’ve had experience with are good people who work hard. There are a few bad apples, but they are the exception not the rule.

      Farmers Markets and on-farm stores are great, but are not available, affordable or convenient for everyone. If you choose to purchase dairy foods at the grocery store, or a quick serve restaurant, you can feel confident you are supporting U.S. dairy farm families. Most dairy farmers don’t process their own products on-farm; we produce milk then ship it to a processing plant where it’s turned into cheese, butter, ice cream, etc. The milk from our farm is shipped to a local family-owned Swiss cheese processing plant. They make Swiss cheese that can be found on grocery store shelves, restaurants and even chicken sandwiches at McDonald's. Their Swiss cheese can’t be found at a Farmers Market or an on-farm store. It’s still a great quality product.

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    2. I appreciate your comments differentiating the traditional family farms and the larger farms with potentially uncaring employees. Dairy Mom is correct that 98% of U.S. dairy farms are family owned. However, these are not all family operated. So many farms that have become very large like to cling to their family ownership structure to present the same warm and fuzzy image as a smaller traditional farm operated with exclusively family labor. When an operation becomes too big for the owner to do or directly supervise all work, it has become too big. It has potentially become a farm that can be infiltrated, videotaped, and manipulated by animal rights activists, whether or not mistreatment ever actually takes place. If an owner were directly involved in all daily activities, these folks could never even set foot on the place.

      As a dairy farmer myself, I know the only reason anyone would choose this profession is a passion for the cattle and the land. It is also a good way to build equity through the years. However, there are many years when a living wage is impossible for the owner, let alone any hired employees. These employees had better have the passion, too (more difficult when it's not "theirs"), or they will become uncaring--especially in the absence of the owner.

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  23. Thank you for your response and for putting my comments up. Although I still disagree with your post that the article is wrong, I would like you to know that I am a vegetarian (so I DO eat cheese) and I oppose eating animals from any source, despite the treatment of the animals before they are murdered. HOWEVER, I always encourage those who must eat meat to buy from farms that they know the animals are treated well.

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    1. I’m glad you enjoy cheese. I’m curious, if you are uncomfortable with the way dairy farmers care for their cows and calves, why do you consume dairy products?

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  24. I buy my cheese from local dairy farmers, whom I believe are humane although I don't think that just because they are local necessarily means that. I drink only soy or almond milk. I also buy eggs from a local woman who has her own chickens: I have seen her chickens and I know they are free range.

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    1. It’s great to support local farmers who you trust. It’s unfortunate that people’s confidence in food has deteriorated so much in recent years. During the same time, animal care and farming methods have improved food quality, food choices and food safety. There is a real disconnect between farmers and consumers. I’m glad social media gives us the opportunity to have dialogue.

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  25. Thanks for writing this, I'm an ex dairy farmer from New Zealand, where our cows live outside year round, and even here there are the militant vegans with alsorts of rubbish leaking out of their fingers into the media, much of it is so much rubbish its shocking, the good thing about farming in new zealand is that there is plenty of rain, however in spring when your cows are calving on pasture this isn't the greatest, so some farmers are now investing in herd homes, so they can have their girls inside when the ground is too soft, well, you should see the brain explosions thats caused the vegan's, not one of whom would have had to have picked up a calf out of a mud puddle in their lives, they actually make me sick that they don't take 5 minutes to actually THINK outside of their narrow farmer hating tunnelvisioned box.

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  26. Hi Dairy Mom,
    So are you producing your own feed or buying the feed fed to the cows?
    Dan

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    1. We grow some of our own feed and purchase some.

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Thank you for reading my blog and taking the time to comment! I’m opening the doors of our farm to share with you and enjoy engaging in discussion. Please be respectful in your comments. I reserve the right to remove posts that include name calling, slander, and vulgar language or contain links to websites that assault animal agriculture.

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